industry

There is an inevitable squeamishness about food products that appear to be the result of tampering with nature (already terms like “Frankenburger” are making the rounds). But Isha Datar, who heads New Harvest, a nonprofit dedicated to research on alternative sources of meat, argues that such characterizations miss the point. “Cultured meat is more like growing plants hydroponically than it is like genetically modifying them,” she says. “It’s creating the same product but through a different process.” Post, meanwhile, suggested that just as some food is certified as “Fair Trade,” cultured beef could be sold with a “Cruelty Free” label. Brin, for his part, talked in broad terms about the industrial slaughter of animals, which struck a chord with people like Dr. Iain Brassington, a lecturer in bioethics at the U.K.’s University of Manchester, who pointed out that “a cow that doesn’t exist can’t suffer.”

Read the full article here: http://www.hemispheresmagazine.com/2013/11/01/meat-and-greet/

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